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<p>Miriam Carey's sisters (L-R) Valerie Carey and Amy Carey-Jones speak to the media outside a home in Bedford-Stuyvesent October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Miriam Carey was shot and killed by federal agents yesterday near the US Capitol building after police say she attempted to ram through a security barrier at the White House. (Photo by Michael Graae/Getty Images)</p>

Miriam Carey's sisters (L-R) Valerie Carey and Amy Carey-Jones speak to the media outside a home in Bedford-Stuyvesent October 4, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Miriam Carey was shot and killed by federal agents yesterday near the US Capitol building after police say she attempted to ram through a security barrier at the White House. (Photo by Michael Graae/Getty Images)

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Miriam Carey, women killed by DC police, funeral service held

NEW YORK -- NEW YORK (AP) — Speakers at Miriam Carey's funeral Tuesday tried to give more insight into the person widely known as the young woman killed by police in Washington after she tried to ram her car through a White House barrier. The 34-year-old single mother was a generous, loving sister — one of five — who was a passionate, fun-loving cook making meals for an extended family in Brooklyn that she considered the most important part of her life, Amy Carey-Jones, one of her sisters, told mourners. She also was ambitious, sharing with her sisters a plan to get a master's degree in a health field, Amy Carey said. Miriam Carey, who had worked as a dental hygienist, was praised by her colleagues for her "delightful bedside manner," said the program for the service, held at Brooklyn chapel and attended by about 90 mourners. Carey was dressed in white, and lay in a white casket. Prayers were offered as the lid was slowly closed; a woman sobbed loudly as the casket was wheeled to a waiting hearse for a police-escorted trip to a Long Island cemetery. She had been living in Stamford, Conn., and is survived by her 1-year-old daughter, who was in the vehicle during the Oct. 3 car chase through the streets of Washington. Carey had been diagnosed with postpartum depression and psychosis. Authorities say she believed President Barack Obama was monitoring her electronically. Police found no weapons in her car, and family members have said officers never should have fired at Carey's vehicle.