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Publicist: Pop superstar Prince dies at his Minnesota home

CHANHASSEN, Minn. (AP) — Pop superstar Prince, widely acclaimed as one of the most inventive and influential musicians of his era with hits including "Little Red Corvette," ''Let's Go Crazy" and "When Doves Cry," was found dead at his home on Thursday in suburban Minneapolis, according to his publicist. He was 57. His publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, told The Associated Press that the music icon died at his home in Chanhassen. No details were immediately released. The singer, songwriter, arranger and instrumentalist broke through in the late 1970s with the hits "Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?" and "I Wanna Be Your Lover," and soared over the following decade with such albums as "1999" and "Purple Rain." The title song from "1999" includes one of the most widely quoted refrains of popular culture: "Tonight I'm gonna party like it's 1999." The Minneapolis native, born Prince Rogers Nelson, stood just 5 feet, 2 inches tall, and seemed to summon the most original and compelling sounds at will, whether playing guitar in a flamboyant style that openly drew upon Jimi Hendrix, switching his vocals from a nasally scream to an erotic falsetto or turning out album after album of stunningly original material. Among his other notable releases: "Sign O' the Times," ''Graffiti Bridge" and "The Black Album."

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Tubman to be new face of $20 bill, Hamilton stays on $10

WASHINGTON (AP) — Harriet Tubman, an African-American abolitionist who was born a slave, will stand with George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Benjamin Franklin among the iconic faces of U.S. currency. The $20 bill will be redesigned with Tubman's portrait on the front, marking two historic milestones, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced Wednesday. Tubman will become the first African-American on U.S. paper money and the first woman to be depicted on currency in 100 years. The leader of the Underground Railroad will replace the portrait of Andrew Jackson, the nation's seventh president and a slave owner, who will be pushed to the back of the bill. Lew also settled a backlash that had erupted after he had announced an initial plan to remove Alexander Hamilton, the nation's first Treasury secretary, from the $10 bill in order to honor a woman on the bill.

Dwyane Wade, the Heat are under pressure

Chris Bosh scored 34 points, Hassan Whiteside had career highs of 23 points and 16 rebounds off the bench and the Miami Heat beat the Los Angeles Clippers 104-90 on Sunday to end a three-game road skid. With a road game against the Los Angeles Lakers last Tuesday night, Miami is feeling the heat as it struggles to reverse a disappointing season thus far.

Unemployment falls for Blacks

Unemployment rates fell for almost every major U.S. demographic group last year as employers added nearly 3 million jobs in the best annual gain since 1999. Still, the surge benefited some groups more than others.

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Darrell Wallace Jr. sets NASCAR milestone as first African-American to win race in 50 years

MARTINSVILLE, Va. -- MARTINSVILLE, Va. (AP) — Darrell Wallace Jr. became the second black driver to win on NASCAR's national level and first in a half-century, taking the Truck Series race Saturday at Martinsville Speedway. Wendell Scott won in Jacksonville, Fla., in December 1963 in what is now known as the Sprint Cup Series, the highest of NASCAR's three national levels. "This means everything," the 20-year-old Wallace said. "This is an emotional win for me, especially doing it in Wendell Scott's backyard. I love coming here to Martinsville, it's always good to me. It finally paid off. I think it's my third trip here. I love coming here. The fans are great here." Wallace, driving for Kyle Busch Motorsports, beat Jeb Burton into Turn 1 off a restart with five laps to go. "We congratulate Darrell Wallace Jr. on his first national series victory, one that will be remembered as a remarkable moment in our sport's history," Brian France, NASCAR's chairman and CEO, said in a statement. "Darrell's success, following fellow NASCAR Drive for Diversity graduate Kyle Larson's win earlier this season, is indicative of a youth and multicultural movement that bodes well for NASCAR's future growth."

Miami Hurricanes NCAA Saga Comes To An End With Sanctions

Miami's football team will lose a total of nine scholarships and the men's basketball team will lose three, as part of the penalties the school was handed last Tuesday by the NCAA as the Nevin Shapiro scandal presumably drew to a close. Both of those scholarship losses will be stretched out over three years. But for the first time since 2010, the football team will be permitted to appear in a postseason game. The school will also serve three years of probation. Former men's basketball coach Frank Haith, now at Missouri, will sit out the first five games of his team's upcoming season, and three former Miami assistant coaches were handed two-year show-cause bans. Even though the NCAA said Miami lacked "institutional control" when it came to monitoring Shapiro, the university is accepting the decision and does not plan to appeal. The NCAA's Committee on Infractions also showed that the Hurricanes' decision to self-impose sanctions was wise. "The committee acknowledged and accepted the extensive and significant self-imposed penalties by the university," the NCAA said.

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President Obama starts his day with these devotionals

Each morning for the past five years, before most of his aides have arrived at the White House, President Barack Obama has read a devotional sent to his BlackBerry, weaving together biblical scripture with reflections from literary and cultural figures. Joshua DuBois, an informal spiritual adviser to Obama who ran the White House faith-based office until earlier this year, writes the devotionals for Obama and has compiled many of them in a forthcoming book, "The President's Devotional," to be released Oct. 22 by HarperOne. A look at some of the devotionals, abridged for space, that have started the president's day: ___ HOLDING OUR PEACE "But the people held their peace and answered him not a word, for the king's commandment was, 'Do not answer him.'" (2 Kings 18:36). Dear God, give me judiciousness in response today. Help me discern when to speak and when to hold my peace. In the end, I know that the victory will be yours, and mine. Amen.

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Goverment reopens after congress ends 16-day shutdown

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government reopened its doors Thursday after a battle-weary Congress approved a bipartisan measure to end a 16-day partial shutdown and avert the possibility of an economy-jarring default on U.S. obligations. Early Thursday, President Barack Obama signed the measure, which the House and Senate passed late Wednesday, ending a brawl with Republicans who tried to use the must-pass legislation to mount a last-ditch effort to derail the president's landmark health care law and demand concessions on the budget. The White House directed all agencies to reopen promptly and in an orderly fashion. Furloughed federal employees across the country are expected to return to work Thursday. The impasse had shuttered national parks and monuments, and mostly closed down NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department. Critical functions of government went on as usual and most federal employees won't see their paychecks delayed, but the closure and potential default weighed on the economy and spooked the financial markets. There were signs early Thursday that the federal government was slowly coming back to life. "We're back from the #shutdown!" the Smithsonian Institution crowed on Twitter, announcing that museums would reopen Thursday and the National Zoo in Washington on Friday. Standard & Poor's estimated the shutdown has taken $24 billion out of the economy, and the Fitch credit rating agency warned Tuesday that it was reviewing its AAA rating on U.S. government debt for a possible downgrade.

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Halle Berry, Oliver Martinez welcome baby boy

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It's a boy for Halle Berry and Olivier Martinez. A representative for the 47-year-old actress confirms that the couple welcomed their son on Saturday. Publicist Meredith O'Sullivan Wasson offered no other details. E! News reports Berry delivered the baby at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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Miriam Carey identified as woman shot by police near Capitol

WASHINGTON (AP) — A woman with a year-old child led Secret Service and police on a harrowing car chase from the White House past the Capitol Thursday, attempting to penetrate the security barriers at both national landmarks before she was shot to death, police said. The child survived. "I'm pretty confident this was not an accident," said Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier. Still, Capitol Police said there appeared to be no terrorist link. The woman apparently was unarmed. Tourists, congressional staff and even some senators watched as a caravan of law enforcement vehicles chase a black Infiniti with Connecticut license plates down Constitution Avenue outside the Capitol. House and Senate lawmakers, inside debating how to end a government shutdown, briefly shuttered their chambers as Capitol Police shut down the building. The woman's car at one point had been surrounded by police cars and she managed to escape, careening around a traffic circle and past the north side of the Capitol. Video shot by a TV camerman showed police pointing firearms at her car before she rammed a Secret Service vehicle and continued driving. Lanier said police shot and killed her a block northeast of the historic building.

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